These 4 Signs Might Mean You Have Postpartum Depression

In pregnancy on October 27, 2016 at 7:18 pm

(PPD) is more common than you’d think. In fact, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 11 to 20 percent of women who give birth have symptoms of it. What’s more, you can begin experiencing PPD up to a year after having a baby, according to the American Pregnancy Association.

But how do you know you have it? While each woman is different, there are consistent themes when it comes to symptoms, say Mary L. Rosser, M.D., Ph.D., director, department of obstetrics and gynecology, Montefiore Health System, and Allison Kurzman, M.D., psychiatrist and clinical instructor of psychiatry at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.

You may experience one, a combination of a few, or all of the symptoms, although it varies by individual, according to Rosser and Kurzman. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, those who have experienced depression or bipolar disorder before, have a family history of mental illness, had medical complications during childbirth, or lacked emotional support from a partner, family, or friends during pregnancy could all be at an increased risk.

Read More: These 4 Signs Might Mean You Have Postpartum Depression

Are You Depressed?


These Are the 4 Stages of a Mom Meltdown

In humor, motherhood on October 27, 2016 at 7:04 pm

Look, it’s not only kids who go over the edge — it’s us mommies too. In fact, now that I mention it, our kids are the biggest reason we’re sometimes ready to blow our gaskets. That, and our partners. And lack of chocolate. Definitely lack of chocolate.

When we can’t keep our composure anymore and are about to bite off a bat’s head, you know that whoever caused us to lose it is in deep, deep trouble. Read through for the four stages of the Mom Meltdown, brought to you by whiny kids, PMS, too much laundry, another PTA fundraiser, and not being able to pee alone in private.

1. The “Is it Getting Hot in Here?” Stage

Your kid asked you for the 50th time if he could use the iPad.

Your partner complained about dinner and then decided to leave dirty clothes on the floor.

The cat puked on your new rug.

You are this close to crying and this close to taking the family dog and leaving for the night, but it’s OK. The cat puke is almost all the way out of the rug, you’re giving your partner the silent treatment, and you told your kid to take the darn iPad already. Your sanity is still intact . . . for now.

Read More: These Are the 4 Stages of a Mom Meltdown

Mommy Needs a Helper,


How to Build Your Strength To Leave

In divorce, divorce advice on October 26, 2016 at 5:54 pm

Hands down the greatest fear involving divorce is the fear of the unknown. It’s the fear of walking away from something you have known for years, maybe even for decades, simply to walk out into the great unknown. If you’re divorcing with kids, the second greatest fear is “How will my kids cope?” but before you can even consider how you will get your kids through the ordeal, you have to commit to making the choice to leave.

I wish I had magic that could tell you that making this choice will be crystal clear and vivid. Indeed, it may. There are some people who after much fretting, getting the feeling and vision that the only choice for survival is to leave, right away! This vision/emotion will carry someone through the whole divorce process.

And then of course, there are many people who fall into the “grey” area. They may know leaving is the best choice, but as they make the call, they struggle internally with whether or not it’s really the right thing. The good news in all of this is no matter what, I can tell you that even if you leave a marriage feeling uncertain and fearful, eventually, you will see that you made the right choice.

That crystal clear vision WILL come.

Read More: How to Build Your Strength To Leave

You Can Do It,