8 Things Your Partner Will Do During Your Labor Instead of Being a Birth Coach

Your partner is so excited about having a baby that, at times, you feel as if they could totally bypass your involvement in the whole baby-making matter, except for the whole labor part (minor detail). Then during the labor, your partner sounds like a sportscaster and posts photos and updates to Facebook the entire time you writhe in pain. You were sort of hoping for a little help with those deep breaths and pushes . . . but sometimes you have to take what you can get.

Read through for eight things your partner will probably do instead of strictly being your birth coach while you’re in labor.

1. Be a sportscaster.

Your partner is probably going to be on their phone texting the play-by-play of your labor: OK folks, she’s about 3 centimeters dilated. Doctor thinks things are progressing well. But suddenly (fumble!) labor slows down. Doc says we may have to take next steps.

You’re probably going to sit there waiting for them to come do all that fun breathing and supportive stuff you saw in the birth class videos, but instead, it’s more like a round table of NFL chat.

Read More: 8 Things Your Partner Will Do During Your Labor Instead of Being a Birth Coach

Can’t Help Him/Herself,

Laura

Why This Working Mom Loves Stay-at-Home Moms

I have been on both sides of the great motherhood coin.

I was once the stay-at-home mom (SAHM) who worked from home at night, or on Sundays strictly part-time, but I was mostly home. I didn’t miss a day with my daughter, and now, I am a working single mother who uses after care and, sometimes, before care. From managing the home front full-time to working 9-to-5 or later full-time, I have done it all. I can tell you the pros and cons of both situations. I can wax poetic on the battles I had as an SAHM, versus the battles I have now as a working parent.

No matter which side of the coin you are on, parenting is a hard job.

I have never understood why other women feel the need to make anyone else’s parenting choice — whether it to be at home or to work — their business. No one’s situation is the same, and for many of us, our situations change and develop as our kids grow. As mothers, we have seasons in our lives in which we have to decide how to prioritize our time, money, and lives based around our kids’ unique developmental needs.

So bottom line, how does putting someone else down for her choice or comparing your situation to someone else’s make anything any better?

Read More: Why This Working Mom Loves Stay-at-Home Moms

Thank You Ladies,

Laura

Stop Shaming Moms For Bringing Kids Out in Public

There are certainly places kids shouldn’t be hanging about. There are certainly places in which children need to monitor their voices and actions. Libraries. Museums. Fancy restaurants . . . the list rolls on.

Parents understand that some places are more kid-friendly than others, and that they need to keep their kids on good behavior in public, but seriously now, raise a hand if you have gotten the nastiest look from the deepest pits of hell because you dared to bring a child out in public and they acted like — gasp — a child!

The other day, I brought my daughter to the pharmacy to pick up medication, and she was cranky. She wanted me to buy her a toy, but I didn’t want to buy her a toy, so in true child fashion, she was annoyed. I had one woman look at me like we were pariahs. All my kid was doing was whining. She wasn’t destroying anything or being excessively loud.

The nasty looks. The unsolicited parenting advice. The eye-rolls and sighs. When someone looks at a child like they’re an atomic bomb or a cockroach, I can’t help but wonder how the planet earth got so populated in the first place.

Listen, it’s fine if you don’t like kids, but get over it in public!

Read More: Stop Shaming Moms For Bringing Kids Out in Public

Get Over It,

Laura