How to Handle Questions About Your Single Parent Status During Interviews

Being a working single parent is tough.

Trying to find a job as a single parent is tougher—especially if you’re an unemployed single parent.

Been there. Done that. Got the t-shirt, wrinkles, and stress-inducing memories to boot.

Even if you’re working already, hunting for a new role and going through the interview process is nerve-wracking.

As a writer, interviewers could look up my work and know I was a single parent. If the

company doesn’t know that you’re a parent and in particular, a single parent, I would

recommend to not share that information unless someone asks you if you have children.

Legally, they shouldn’t at all—and you don’t have to answer. It’s up to you.

While I’d like to tell all of you that your single parent status won’t come up during

interviews thanks to proper HR protocol, that’s not the case. I’ve had many interviews

where hiring managers, potential coworkers and other staff have asked me either

pointed questions or direct questions. In some cases, I had great responses prepared

because I had been “down that road” before but in other cases, I either balked or got

frustrated.

Read More: How to Handle Questions About Your Single Parent Status During Interviews

You’ve Got This!

Laura

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5 Ways Sex Makes You a Better Mom and Employee

Listen up, girlfriends: All those times you’ve been saying you’ve got a headache is secretly jeopardizing your home and employment life. Having more sex makes you a better employee—and mother! No, really. The more times you hop in the sack, the more likely you are to hit a home run at work and with the kiddos. Here’s why:

1. You’ll Get Better Sleep

Having sex helps you get better sleep—something we could all use. As you bond with your partner, your body secretes the hormone oxytocin, often called “the love hormone.” That’s also the same hormone responsible for bonding with your baby, especially when nursing. Thanks to oxytocin, your body will be more relaxed, so you’ll be less stressed, leading to better sleep for you, mama.

And with better sleep comes a brighter morning handling a bunch of kids before running off to work and kicking serious butt in the office. So say yes next time your significant other wants to get frisky. Maybe you’ll get a raise, too!

 

Read More: 5 Ways Sex Makes You a Better Mom and Employee

Do It Tonight,

Laura

10 Signs You’re a New Working Mom

If you still dread handing off your new baby to daycare, if you wonder how you’re going to manage at work while missing your precious kids, if you’re toting a breast pump back and forth every day, if you’ve got spit-up on your button-down shirt, yep, you’re a new working mom. You know what? Millions of mothers who have walked the same path have survived and thrived (and so have their kids). It will get better, it will get easier. Meanwhile, take comfort in these new-working-mom common bonds—and take in a few tips too.

1. Your daycare knows your voice the minute you say hi.

You have called your caregiver so many times that they know your ring and answer the phone with your name. But they get it: You can’t help checking up on your child. Meanwhile, to manage daycare anxiety pangs:
• Be sure you’ve chosen the right childcare fit for your situation. It could be daycare, it could be a nanny or an au pair. If you’re not sure which is the better way, read this article on which option will work best for you.
• Remind yourself to breathe—your anxiety may be affecting your health.
• Ease up on yourself. It’s totally OK to be concerned this new phase for you and your baby.

Read More: 10 Signs You’re a New Working Mom

It’s Tough, But You Can Do It!

Laura

4 Things Your Childless Co-Workers Think About You as a Working Mom

As a working mom, your childless co-workers may or may not have thought this about you as a working parent and co-worker.

It’s not that your childless co-workers aren’t awesome — they are! — or that they don’t like kids (they may or they may not!) but that from time to time, they think you get perks that are unfair thanks to your status as a mom.

1. How Come She Gets Flex Time?

I am of the school of thought that companies should offer flex hours, whether you’re a parent or not. I understand that not everyone may deserve that privilege, but if employees are stuck to their desks and jobs 24/7, eventually, they will quit. Burnout is not pretty, and if you are a working parent, you know how hard that work-life balance is. Everyone needs it.

Read More: 4 Things Your Childless Co-Workers Think About You as a Working Mom

Why Her?

Laura

Working Through Divorce

As a newly single mother living on one income, having a job is high on my priority list. I was working part-time when I was married, and once my husband and I separated I immediately had to go back to full-time work. Learning to navigate a new job and single motherhood while going through a divorce was tough. If you’re in or have ever been in this boat, you know what I mean.

So how can working moms get through divorce with their jobs intact? First things first: Make sure your kids are cared for. You can never have enough backup care, suggests psychologist Leah Klungness, Ph.D., co-author of The Complete Single Mother.

Read More: Working Through Divorce

It’s Tough,

Laura