Is Your Child Possessive? Here’s Why

Children can be possessive for a number of reasons, particularly during the toddler “it’s mine” stage. Signs of possessiveness include:

  • Unwilling to share toys
  • Unwilling to share a parent, both parents, or a favorite friend
  • Possessiveness over a new sibling
  • Possessiveness over a space or favorite part of a room or setting
  • Bossing around or cutting out other kids from playtime or other activities

If your child is possessive during the toddler years, it’s up to us as parents to not only deal with this developmental stage but to also encourage how to share and when perhaps not to share depending on where your parenting views fall when it comes to sharing. However, a child can be possessive either during or not during the toddler years for a variety of reasons, such as divorce, a move, a new school, the loss of a parent or loved one, the birth of a new sibling, and other reasons. Here are a few situations that may make your child show the green jealousy eye rather frequently.

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Laura

Yes, My 4-Year-Old Does Chores and No, She Isn’t Always Rewarded For Them

The other day I posted an image of my daughter’s chore chart on Facebook alongside with a photo of her swiffering. Many parents eagerly clicked “like” and said how great it was that I have my young daughter actively taking care of the home she lives in. Of course, I had a few other people say how long her list was and how it was “way too much for a young kid to do.”

On the list her chores are:

Bring in the mail
Clean & set plate
Put away shoes when you get home
Put dirty laundry in hamper
Help mom fold laundry
Help put laundry away
Swiffer play area
Wipe down bathroom sink with mom’s help
Dust with mom’s help
Make bed
There are no consequences if she DOESN’T do her chores, and many are ones in which she helps me rather than does the chore alone.

Read More: Yes, My 4-Year-Old Does Chores and No, She Isn’t Always Rewarded For Them

Let Them Do The Work,

Laura

Why I Tell My Daughter Girls Are Smarter Than Boys

The other day I took my daughter with me to the dry cleaners. As we were talking, ( I was getting pants tailored) I told her, “Girls are smarter than boys. Remember that.”

A woman in the dry cleaners looked appalled. She said to me, “Well we women need strong men. It’s important to have strong men.”

I looked at my daughter again, right in those impressionable toddler eyes and said, “Girls are smarter than boys honey.”

The woman repeated her diatribe, and I placated her with, “Of course, of course”, and then the conversation ended.

Look, I’m not anti-boy. I know there are plenty of smart men in the world, but that’s not what this is all about.

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Mom in the Mirror

Dear Mom in the Mirror:

You didn’t make anything homemade today.

All you do was heat up leftovers, slacker.

Your kid was bad in the store today, so you had to withdraw a privilege, and now you feel like crap.

You know it had to be done, but you work so much Mom, that when you have to be Bad Cop, which it always seems that that role is on you, it hurts.

Shouldn’t you have predicted your kid would act out? Shouldn’t you have known Mom?

What are you doing wrong to make your kid act so out of character?

Are you a bad Mom, mom?

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Mom at Work: The Disappearing Mother

Today is my birthday.

Do you know what my best present was?

I didn’t get many, but my best present was seeing my daughter.

My best present was putting her to bed. Bathing her.

Eating some cake with her.

See, I’m a working mom now with a long commute. So I feel as if I am slowly disappearing from her life.

I’ve never dropped her off at school. I’ve never picked her up.

I’ve met her teachers all but one, (there are 3) once.

She tells me stories of kids whose faces I don’t know.

She has a day that I know little about.

I know this is bound to be for every parent, but it is hard being Mom at work.

Being Mom far away at work.

Does my 2 year-old think I love her less?

Does she remember when we were home together?

Does she think of me when she is hurt at school or tired?

Do I register on her mind?

Am I doing the right thing?

Mom at work has to be everything: good employee, great mom, multitasker, and police.

Making sure everyone else who is taking care of her is doing his or her job since you can’t be there to do it yourself.

Hopefully one day my daughter will say, “My mom is a successful woman. And heck, she is a good mom too.”

Just wish it were easier.

For now, I will look forward to bathtime and bedtime, the weekends, and the five minutes I see her before I go off to work. Maybe it’s not the quantity, but truly the quality we spend with our kids that matters. I try to remind myself of that.

Be good to yourselves Mommies at Work.