6 Strategies to Teach Your Angry Kid to Calm Down

Like most humans, kids get angry, except for when young children get angry, they don’t always know the right way to let off steam leaving you the mom with a heated child who’s having a wicked temper tantrum. How do you get your kid to express his or her anger in a positive way? When my ex-husband and I separated, my daughter struggled with letting out her anger simply because she was 3 and so young when we began the divorce process and didn’t (and still doesn’t quite) understand divorce. It’s complicated enough for adults to grieve the end of a marriage, much less a toddler or preschooler. So we sought out a way to help her express and handle her emotions through play therapy. Try teaching your kid these six strategies to blow a gasket without raising an actual ruckus.

Read More: 6 Strategies to Teach Your Angry Kid to Calm Down

Breathe In, Breathe Out,

Laura

Dear Moms (and Dads): If Your Kid’s Whiny, You Only Have Yourself To Thank

Nothing good comes from whining yet from time to time, I have seen my daughter, my nephews and nieces, as well as all my friends’ children complain until the cows come home.

Was moaning and groaning successful for these kids? Sometimes yes, sometimes no. I admit that as much as I try to toe the hardline, there are day I’m too tired to fight my daughter’s whining and just say, “Alright already.” But it’s a slippery slope and one I’m working hard to avoid sliding down. Because the fact is: if your kid is a whining, moaning, complaining mess there is only one person to thank for that — and it’s not genetics or your in-laws.

It’s you.

Read More:Dear Moms: If Your Kid’s Whiny, You Only Have Yourself To Thank

It’s My Party & I’ll Cry If I Want To? No Thanks,

Laura

To All The Parents I Judged Before I Was A Parent: I’m Sorry

To all the parents I judged before I was a parent: I’m Sorry!

kid

 

I remember all the times I gave parents a secret dirty look.

“Oh why is that kid not wearing shoes or socks? It’s freezing out!”

Listening to another tantrum in Target—on karmic end, I never gave a nasty look or made any bad comments. I usually felt bad for the kid—“Oh boy, someone’s having a bad day. I’m so glad I don’t have a kid.”

“Jesus is that kid a brat! Parents these days. They spoil kids, you know?”

I was a regular old “know-it-all” yet I had barely parented a plant. Continue reading