Is It Time To Take a Huge Risk to Change Your Life?

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Photo by Zoltan Fekeshazi on Unsplash

Have you ever felt as if you are stuck and not moving forward? I had the feeling that I was stuck and it shook me to the core. I spent the summer really trying to get into a “chill happy zone,” and it was a relaxing summer– until summer was over and sh*t hit the fan again. For a while, I felt as if I were un-gluing myself and moving forward. I saw the light at the end of the tunnel and was experiencing seriously rewarding happy moments even amongst really dark times.

But here I am, feeling like all those steps forward just led me about 50 million steps back.

I decided that essentially, something has to give before I do.

Sometimes you have to take a huge risk to get big rewards. Without that risk– you (I) will never know what could be. Remaining stagnant is just not acceptable, especially if it you are stuck in a place that you just can’t stand.

I decided that I will take a massive leap and make a big change if I feel that things are still stuck by the time the school year ends.

If this is you– feeling like you’re a hamster stuck running on your wheel– consider making a change.

In the following 3 cases, I think it is worth making a huge change and taking a risk in order to be happy:

Job Dissatisfaction

If you can’t stand showing up to the place and feel no reward from your role– it’s time to take a chance. Maybe you switch jobs. Maybe you even switch careers. Maybe you go back to school.

Romantic Dissatisfaction

Feeling doomed or stuck in a bad marriage/relationship?

Maybe it’s time to move. Maybe it’s time for a divorce. Maybe it is time to shell out dollars for an elite dating service. Maybe it’s time to chop your hair or get some minor touch ups.

Family Dissatisfaction

Would marriage counseling or family counseling help? Do you need an executive function coach for your oldest? Do you all need to move?

It may be time to regroup for everyone’s sanity.

Consider This …

Before you break, you have to bend. It may be time to make a drastic change. Before doing so, give yourself a timeline like I did.

Consider:

  • a time period to think your choice through
  • optional plans B and C, in case you have too many hesitations
  • one trusted individual to ponder and plan your decision with
  • research needed ahead of time to be successful

Good Luck!

Laura

When Nothing Gets Easier & Everything Gets Harder, Even The Strong Need Support

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Photo by Ian Stauffer on Unsplash

One of the hardest things about being the youngest of four kids with a large age gap between me and the other 3 kids, is that my parents are older and unable to support me and be there for me in the way I wish they could. I understand why they can’t though, especially with my mom’s health issues, but it is still hard. They root for me on the sidelines, but because they are dealing with a lot– I cannot at their age ask for too much. In fact, I try to give instead of take when it comes to them. They paid their dues in their eighties to be helped instead of burdened.

Still, it makes it really challenging– especially when going through a very hard situation knowing that they can’t physically be there for me.

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6 Ways to Hide You’re Hurting When You Can’t Be Real

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Photo by Sami Hobbs on Unsplash

It’s not easy keeping it together if you are feeling depressed or going through some serious life stuff. A biggest part of the challenge is hiding it.

Sure, maybe you have people you can come clean with, but for the most part, adult life is going through the motions without showing the “emotions”– unless you trust someone and let your guard down. I’m not saying you should fake it and not get help. If you are depressed, you should get help. But what I am saying, is sometimes you have to keep it together when you’re out in public or in a situation that demands privacy.

Here are some tips for keeping cool when really, you need a hug and a break.

1. Steer conversations towards other people

Avoid questions and have the person talk about him or herself. Most people like to do that!

2. Take time outs

Take a mental health day. Go for a walk. Hide out for a while and work in a different location in the office.

3. Say, “I’d rather not…”

Discuss it. When people ask if you are upset, you can decline talking– and find someone you trust to vent to.

4. Take a drive and cry

If your kids can’t see you cry or you just need to let it out, blast some music and cry a bit. Just watch the road.

5. Can say you’re fine

Not ready to talk to someone about your hurt feelings? Say you’re fine and wait for a time when you’re more composed.

6. Exercise, meditate or dance

Move. Move and mooove. Put your sadness or stress into the motions.

 

Chin up– hang tight– and hope for the best,

Laura

 

 

9 Signs of Serious Depression at the Holidays

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Photo by Warren Wong on Unsplash

Suicide Prevention Month is technically September but with the holidays rolling around, I thought it might be helpful to talk about it now. Many people feel alone, worthless and stressed at this time of year.

It’s not unusual for people to hit a rock bottom during this time of year. Unfortunately, I have known a few people (mostly from a distance) that took a turn for the worse right around Thanksgiving and Christmas.

So, I figured I might compile a list of some symptoms of serious depression so you can all keep an eye on your loved ones or yourselves if needed. A person very close to me lost someone she loved to suicide and it was and is, an unending wound. Hug your loved ones tightly this season and be the supportive ear that person might need!

9 Signs of Serious Depression– Especially at the Holidays

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How to Handle Being Single at The Holidays

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Photo by Roberto Nickson on Unsplash

Single at the holidays? It can make you feel that truly, baby– it’s damn cold outside! Not to mention those lonely mistletoes hanging around with no action to be seen. Of course, your bedroom isn’t seeing much action either, eh?

I think too many people put pressure to have love at the holidays. Not that I can blame them. Kissing at midnight when the ball drops? Champagne and bubble baths? Getting some warmth on these frigid December nights? It all sounds incredibly appealing …

So, what do you do then if you’re single? If you enjoy your single days– well then, yay! Simply bask in the joy of not having to buy someone else a gift. Or dealing with someone’s family.

However if it bothers you, here are some things to keep in mind: Continue reading

5 Things People May Think When Recovering From Abuse

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Photo by _Mxsh_ on Unsplash

When someone has gotten out of a traumatic situation, it’s very common to struggle with complex emotions and thoughts. More often than not, the abused will blame themselves for the abuser’s bad behavior, especially if the abuser was narcissistic.
1. Victims may retreat, lose/gain weight and feel depressed

It’s not unusual for victims of abuse to retreat from others out of shame, self-blame or desire to keep the abuse a secret.

Of course, it’s not the person’s fault and he or she shouldn’t be ashamed, but after being treated a certain way, it can be hard to not feel down about oneself.
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3 Things to NOT Do When Supporting a Loved One After Abuse

If you have a friend, romantic partner or family member who has been physically, emotionally, verbally or financially abused, this person needs your support.

If you really care, these are something things you can avoid doing to make this person’s recovery better and smooth.

1. Don’t Avoid Talking About It 

If this person brings up the event or abuse, don’t dodge talking about it. Obviously it’s not the most fun topic to chat about, but  avoiding the topic is basically invalidating how the person feels. Talking about something like abuse is not easy so if the person gets the courage to discuss, let them talk. It takes a lot of courage.

 

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Walking Away & Giving Up Is Sometimes The Only Option

Sometimes in life, you’ve got to quit the fight and battle.

When it comes to important things like, taking care of your health or paying down debts, you mustn’t quit. But when it comes to other things, walking away and giving up on a situation or person can be incredibly smart.

Consider the person who has tried for so long to make a broken marriage work.

Consider the person who is trying to get a friend sober or get the person help with other issues all with no effort being done on the part of the other party.

Consider the person who has tried so hard to make a relationship get off the ground while the other person does nothing.

In those situations, walking away and letting go and seeing what the universe has in store for you is the best thing you can do.

If you’re that person putting in all the effort into a relationship while the other person does nothing–  give up!

If you’re the person trying to get someone to get help for an addiction or problem, yet the person refuses to get treatment … give up!

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What It’s Really Like to Accept Something You Can’t Change

One of the hardest things to accept is being unable to change something or someone that you care about. Of course, we’re all supposed to love someone as he or she is– but, there are times when we want a partner to change an unhealthy habit, get help or do something for us or our relationship. But as much as you may want this change, your partner or love interest may not. This is heartbreaking.

Consider this:

  • The partner with a bad drug habit
  • The partner with an untreated mental health disease
  • The partner who won’t commit or move forward
  • The partner who wants a divorce when we don’t

Sometimes, there are situations we want to change, not people, but we cannot.

Like:

  • Working conditions
  • Our health
  • Financial matters

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How to Stop The Cycle of Negativity

It’s very hard to break the cycle of negativity … especially if you don’t even realize you’re in it. When we get in a funk or feel hopeless, the thoughts tend to generate so rapidly that it can be a slippery situation to get out of. Suddenly, everything looks really bleak and one bad thing just proceeds to the next. Stepping out of that dark cloud could feel impossible.

But, we all feel negative, sad or dark at times. This is part of our humanity and normal.

Peter J. Economou, Ph.D., ABPP- Board Certified Cognitive and Behavioral Therapy, also known as Dr. Pete, shares that “Research tells us that most of us have negative thoughts— in fact, the majority of our thoughts are negative, so working on accepting them helps people develop a healthier relationship with these thoughts so that they don’t impact the behavior. I like to think of those negative thoughts as passengers on the bus, rather than the bus driver. So, how do we accept these thoughts and cycles, while committing to healthier and more peaceful living? That is key.”

Read More: How to Stop The Cycle of Negativity

Positivity Is Contagious,

Laura